Tag Archives: Crocodile Stitch

Dragon Scale Chunky Phone Cozy Crochet Pattern


This pattern results in a very thick chunky phone case. Compare the phone size and final cozy size as described below. The chunk could be suitable for absorbing impacts, like dropping your phone! But don’t test that out on purpose, just in case!

The pattern is in UK crochet terminology. Worked as one piece, in the round.
For US readers, the stitches conversion is included in the “Terminology used” section, below, in brackets (or parentheses…!)

The scales are worked up using a repeat of 2 rows, first setting up the Vs which form the frame of the scales, and then using these same Vs (alternately) onto which the scale is built.  This is usually termed “Crocodile stitch”, here I’m taking a leap into fantasy land and calling it “Dragon scales”!
The repeat is offset by 1 V each time, to give the overlapping scales pattern.
10 Vs = 5 scales

Final dimensions:
Using double-knit wool with 3.5mm crochet hook.
Width 3 3/8 inch, 8.5 cm
Height 5 1/4 inch, 13.5 cm

To fit phone up to:
Width 2.5 inch, 6.25 cm
Height 4 7/8 inch, 12.5 cm

Terminology used:
st = stitch
sl st = slip stitch
ch = chain stitch
dc = double crochet (sc = single crochet)
tr = treble crochet (dc = double crochet)
ch1 sp = chain 1 space

Round 1 – initial row of Vs.
Ch 14.
Tr in 5th chain from hook (4 ch & tr counts as 1st V)
(Tr, ch 1, tr) in same st. Sk 2 st, (tr, ch 1, tr) in 3rd st. Sk 2 st, (tr, ch 1, tr) in 3rd st. Sk 2 st, (tr, ch 1, tr) 3 times in the last chain.
Turn work around, to work the next stitches in the other side of starting chain.
Sk 2 st, (tr, ch 1, tr) in 3rd st (the same stitch as the V on the other side). Sk 2 st, (tr, ch 1, tr) in 3rd st (the same stitch as the V on the other side). Sk 2 st, (tr, ch 1, tr) in 3rd st. Sl st to 3rd st of starting ch 4.
(10 Vs)

Round 1 completed.
Round 1 completed. Sorry it’s blurry… I didn’t double-check for shaky hand!

Round 2 – first row of scales.
For this first row of scales, it can be difficult to see exactly what you’re doing, check you are placing the trebles around the correct V.
Using ALTERNATE Vs as the base for the following stitches, first going down one side, then up the other, creates the scales pattern.

Sl st into ch1 sp of 1st V (corner)
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 2nd V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 2nd V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 4th V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 4th V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 6th V (around the corner), ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 6th V. Now working on the other side of the piece.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 8th V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 8th V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 10th V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 10th V. Sl st into the ch1 sp of 1st V.
(5 scales)

Round 3 – second row of Vs.
Ch 4 (counts as 1 tr and 1 ch), tr in same space.
*(tr, ch 1, tr) at the top of the scale. (tr, ch 1, tr) joining the edges of the 2 scales to the V behind.*
Repeat from * to * around. Join with a sl st to 3rd ch of starting ch 4.
(10 Vs)

Rounds 2 & 3 completed.
Rounds 2 & 3 completed. Note that the Vs are located between and in the middle of each scale. Where they are between the scales, the Vs connect the edges of the scales to the V behind.

Round 4 – second row of scales.
Sl st into ch1 sp of 1st V, sl st over the next 2 tr, sl st into ch1 sp of 2nd V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 3rd V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 3rd V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 5th V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 5th V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 7th V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 7th V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 9th V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 9th V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 1st V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 1st V. Sl st into the ch1 sp of 2nd V.

Round 5 – Vs round.
Ch 4 (counts as 1 tr and 1 ch), tr in same space.
*(tr, ch 1, tr) at the top of the scale. (tr, ch 1, tr) joining the edges of the 2 scales to the V behind.*
Repeat from * to * around. Join with a sl st to 3rd ch of starting ch 4.
(10 Vs)

Round 6 – scales round.
Always assume the “1st V” is the next stitch after where you finished the last round.
Sl st into ch1 sp of 1st V, sl st over the next 2 tr, sl st into ch1 sp of 2nd V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 3rd V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 3rd V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 5th V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 5th V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 7th V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 7th V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 9th V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 9th V.
4 tr from top to bottom around the RH-side of the 1st V, ch 1, 4 tr from bottom to top around the LH-side of the 1st V. Sl st into the ch1 sp of 2nd V.

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Round 6 completed. Note the alternate, overlapping placement of the scales.

Repeat rounds 5 and 6 until you have reached the height of your phone. Ending on a scales round (R6).
11 rows of scales gives the dimensions as described above.

Finishing:
Dc evenly around the top, joining the scales to the Vs behind as required. Place 2 dcs along the sides of each scale and 1 dc at the ends and middle of each scale (joining to the Vs behind). Join with a sl st. Fasten off.
31 dc, total.

Finished Dragon Scale Phone Cozy!  iPhone 5 used to compare size.
Finished Dragon Scale Phone Cozy! iPhone 5 used to compare size.
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More Baby Crochet Projects (perhaps the last for a while!)


Just a quickie this time! I’ve made quite a few presents for friends and family that have been having babies.  The latest being the cloche hats (both of which are going to the same person), so I made a complete set by making one last pair of booties.

That’s it.  No more!  By staying in and making presents, I’m missing out on a few things (not that I’m complaining, I LOVE to crochet!).  Or at least, I can make a start on some more adult-sized patterns.

Booties, hats and lots of flower motifs… collect the whole set:

My spring cloche hat project, daisy cloche hat, and matching booties. All headed to a good home.
This is the last pair for a while. I’ve made several of these now!

*phew*

Crocodile Stitch Scarf/Neck Warmer Project


By the time I finished this project, which is a gift for a friend (I’ve yet to actually see her to give it to her!), winter is practically over!  But never mind, I’m sure it will get some use in the future..

Once you’ve started working the crocodile stitch, you realise how easy it is (and addictive!). The pattern I used here is available to buy through the same etsy shop as the Crocodile Stitch Baby Booties which I’ve made twice now for Christmas and Birthday presents (in various sizes), by Bonita Patterns.

I’ve used a super-soft cotton rich yarn, 4-ply and a 4.5mm hook to create this lovely piece.  It’s so nice, that I’m probably going to have to make another one now (because I want one for myself!).

Crocodile Stitch Neck Warmer.  Finished, with red buttons down the centre of one side.  Can be done up either left or right-handed.
Crocodile Stitch Neck Warmer. Finished, with red buttons down the centre of one side. It can therefore be done up either left or right-handed.
Crocodile Stitch Neck Warmer. One way to wear!
Crocodile Stitch Neck Warmer. One way to wear!  You can choose how you do up the buttons, as each of the crocodile stitches has a hole in the centre which can be used for a button-hole.  So there are a multitude of ways to wear this piece.  Be creative!

This neck warmer should go well with my buddy’s red coat (that gives the game away a bit!). And of course I had to be fair so I’ve made her hubby a blue beanie hat also…

I think the whole family has got (or will soon receive) a prezzie now.

Outside-In Crochet Sunflower Motif (Crocodile Stitch Petals)


I’ve made a few things lately using the crocodile stitch, which is really simple to do. Just looking at the pattern that this stitch makes, I thought that it was ideal for the petals of flowers. The only trouble is because of the way the stitches overlap, there’s only one way to make it look right, and that’s by starting from the outside!

The example here was made using double-knitting yarn and a 5 mm crochet hook (UK 6, USA 8/H) the finished motif is 15 cm (6-ish inches) in diameter. Using a smaller hook size will make the stitches tighter and the overall motif a little smaller.  I use UK crochet terminology.

Working OUTSIDE-IN: 1st round is the largest, and then all the following rounds get smaller and smaller, ending in the very middle of the motif.

Begin:
Ch 80, join with sl st to first ch – ensure work is not twisted.

Round 1:
Ch 4, 1 tr in same st, *skip next 4 chain, (1 tr, ch 1, 1 tr) in 5th ch* repeat from * to * around, sl st in 3rd ch of starting ch 4. (16 V’s total – Fig 1.)

Fig 1. Round 1 complete
Fig 1. Round 1 complete, 16 V’s. The longer starting chain allows the motif to lie flat.

Round 2:
Sl st in to ch 1 sp, *working down the side of the next “V” from top to bottom, work 5 fptr (front post treble crochet) around the tr, ch 1, working up the other side of the same “V” from bottom to top, work 5 fptr around the tr, skip next V* and work from * to * around alternate V’s around, sl st to 1st fptr. (8 petals – Fig 2.)

wpid-20150320_145146.jpg
Fig 2. Round 2 complete, by crocheting around the posts of the trebles which form the V’s, you create the petal shape. Use every other V.

Round 3:
Ch4, 1 tr in same space (around both the join between “petals” and the V of the previous round), *1 tr, ch 1, 1 tr, in the ch 1 space of the next petal, 1 tr, ch 1, 1 tr in the ch 1 space and around the join between next petal* repeat from * to * around, sl st in 3rd ch of starting ch 4.  (16 V’s – Fig 3.)

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Fig 3. Second row of 16 V’s, overlapping the petals and the previous row of V’s.

Round 4:
*5 fptr working down the side of the 1st V from top to bottom, ch 1, 5 fptr around the other side of the V from bottom to top, skip next V*, repeat from * to * around, sl st to 1st fptr. (8 petals, in an alternating pattern to the first round of petals)

Round 5:
Ch 1, dc in same ch 1 sp (around the join between petals and the V of the previous round), dc evenly around (approx. 2 dc between each V, and 1 dc in each of the 16 V’s around and within the petals), sl st to 1st dc. (48 dc – Fig 4.)

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Fig 4.  Rounds 4 & 5, showing petals in an alternating pattern and the round of dc to tidy up the edge.

Fasten off, and attach new colour for centre of flower.

Round 6:
Ch 1, htrdec (half-treble-decrease: insert hook into next st, yo, pull up loop, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up loop, yo, pull through 2 loops, yo pull through 2 loops) evenly around, sl st to join. (24 htrdec – Fig 5.)

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Fig 5. Decreasing the middle of the flower. 24 htrdec evenly around.

Round 7:
Ch 1, htrdec evenly around, sl st to join. (12 htrdec)

Round 8:
Ch 1, htrdec evenly around, sl st to join. (6 htrdec – Fig 6.)

wpid-20150320_172408.jpg
Fig 6. Decreases completed for 2 more rounds.

Finishing:
Cut the yarn, leaving enough extra length for one more stitch.  Pull the working loop and end through to the back of the motif, close the hole in the centre of the flower with a dc. Trim and weave in ends (Fig 7.).

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Fig 7. Finished! Using a smaller hook may make these stitches tighter and tidier.

Yet More Booties!


Good News Everyone! Today my best buddy gave birth to her and her husband’s second child, a girl with the adorable name of Amelia-Rose. Aaw.

In what is probably now going to become a tradition, I made some booties! This time in purple, so lizard booties have become frilly booties. And also, I made the 4-year-old big sister a matching pair of slippers using the same pattern, and a chunkier wool… everybody likes a present.

The pattern is referenced in my previous booties post!

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